SAUDI ARABIA AT THE G-20 ROME SUMMIT 2021

SAUDI ARABIA AT THE G-20 ROME SUMMIT 2021

     Climate change has been the talk of the world recently, like many conferences, summits, and forums are being held around the globe to find adequate solutions to save the planet, knowing that it’s undoubtedly challenging. Yet, when the world unites, everything could be possible. And as they say, “one hand can’t clap on its own”, each country is responsible for reducing the environmental breakdowns. Therefore it will somehow be easier to face climate change. 

 

      Speaking of summits, Rome hosted the G20 on the 30th and 31st of October, for the first time in Italy. It was held just before the launch of the COP26, a worldwide summit on climate change, in Glasgow, Scotland. Leaders of the world’s 20 biggest economies gathered to address the most pressing global challenges aiming to reduce their effects as much as possible. Saudi Arabia also took part in the 2-day forum through King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud’s virtual participation, and the physical presence of Minister of Foreign Affairs Prince Faisal bin Farhan. 

 

     It is important to shed light on the fact that in 2020 Riyadh hosted the G-20’s summit virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic, under the theme “Realizing Opportunities of 21st Century for All”. It comprised three main topics: empowering people, safeguarding the planet, and shaping new frontiers. 

 

     This year, G20’s Rome summit agenda centered around three main topics: climate change, global health, and the general economy. 

 

KING SALMAN’S STATEMENT AT THE G20

 

King Salman bin Abdulaziz highlighted the vital role of the G-20’s member states as they “took unprecedented measures” to deal with the pandemic's outcomes. He added that even after twenty months since the pandemic outbreak, the global economy is still suffering while stressing that “despite the recovery journey that began in some economies, low-income countries still face challenges in processing and distributing vaccines”. Due to that, King Salman’s shedded light on the ultimate role of the G-20 members to “facilitate access to the vaccines”. In the same context, he underlined that Saudi Arabia, through the policies and measures taken, “have contributed to reducing the health, economic, and social circumstances” in the Kingdom. On climate change, King Salman asserted that “the kingdom will continue its pioneering role in providing the world clean energy”. 

 

THE ADOPTION OF THE G20 ROME DECLARATION

 

The G20 Rome Declaration, which includes 59 commitments covering different sectors, was approved by all the participating countries. So what are the main key points agreed on at the summit?

 

  • To consider COVID-19 vaccines as a global public good.
  • To boost the supply of vaccines in developing countries.
  • To keep global warming at the 1.5 degrees Celsius level.
  • To have a fairer and stable international tax system.
  • To reach a target of net-zero emission by or around-mid century.
  • To channel $100bn towards the poorest nations through the IMF.
  • To achieve food security and adequate nutrition for all.
  • To intensify the actions to conserve, protect, restore and sustainably use marine biodiversity.
  • To mobilize international public and private finance to support green and sustainable energy development.
  • To commit to gender equality and acknowledge the vital role of women for sustainable development. 
  • To commit to ensuring access to quality education for all, with particular attention to women and vulnerable students.
  • To commit to taking steps to support the full inclusion of migrants, including migrant workers, and refugees.
  • To commit to zero tolerance for corruption in the public and private sectors and achieve common goals in the global fight against corruption.

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

“The percentage of leaders’ compliance with their pledges since the beginning of the G20 summit is 71%, and at the G-20 summit in Riyadh in 2020, the percentage rose to 85%”. 

John Kirton, Founder and Director of G20 Research Group (30 October, 2021  )

Article

Last update: 2 November 2021